Charlies_Dessert_House

About Our Menu!

WHERE DO OUR DESSERTS COME FROM?

One of my goals when creating the Charlie’s menu was to bring an abundance of flavours from around the world back to my home town in Tasmania. Feeling blessed to have experienced and eaten so much the world has to offer, I really wanted to extend a round-the-world trip to all who enter Charlie’s, by way of a flavoursome menu to highlight the best desserts the world has to offer.

For those interested in knowing where each dessert comes from, here is a complete list providing the backstory to our desserts! Hopefully this will inspire you to come in and taste a new dish with each visit, though we’re sure you will quickly find a favourite on the menu!

Charlies_Dessert_House

STICKY DATE

Origin: England

Cooking Method: Steamed

Description: This moist sponge cake is a British classic, filled with finely chopped dates for sweetness and covered in a rich butterscotch sauce. The addition of almond praline brings a new texture to the dish, whilst not taking away from this much-celebrated, simple but delicious dessert.

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WARM COOKIE SUNDAE

Origin: United States

Cooking Method: Baked

Description: Also known as a “pizookie”, the pizza cookie originates from BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse, located throughout the United States. These undercooked cookies have become a staple dish throughout North America and you’ll be hard pressed to find a town that doesn’t serve them at one restaurant or another!

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CHOCOLATE VOLCANO

Origin: France

Cooking Method: Baked

Description: Also known as a “Molten cake”. The origins of this dessert are contested, however it has quickly become a staple menu item on many high-end restaurant menus around the world. The crisp exterior hides the ultimate surprise: a runny centre filled with rich, high quality chocolate. image via)

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APPLE CRUMBLE

Origin: England

Cooking Method: Baked

Description: The apple crumble originated in Britain during World War II food rationing. The simple topping made of flour, butter and brown sugar resembles breadcrumbs, with stewed fruit underneath for added sweetness. Charlie’s serves this dish with a self serve butterscotch sauce, bringing a delicious caramel flavour to the British classic.

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CHOCOLATE FONDUE

Origin: United States with Swiss Influence

Cooking Method: Slow-melt

Description: The origins of a chocolate fondue are traced back to New York City in 1956, when the owner of Chalet Suisse took a traditional Swiss Fondue (melted cheese) and used chocolate instead, in an organised promotion for Toblerone.

 

CHILLED CACAO MOUSSE

Origin: France

Cooking Method: Chilled

Description: Mousse itself originates from mid-19th century France. Depending on the preparation and technique, mousse can range from light and fluffy to a thick and creamy texture. Using high quality 70% cacao allows for a rich, purist chocolate mousse that is completely dairy-free and refined sugar free.

 

RASPBERRY MERINGUE SMASH 

Origin: England

Cooking Method: Baked & Whipped

Description: Also known as “Eton Mess”, the combination of meringue, cream and berries originates from the annual Eton College vs. Harrow School cricket match in England.

 

BANOFFEE PIE

Origin: England

Cooking Method: Chilled

Description: The Banoffee pie is a popular English dessert, originating from an East Sussex restaurant in the 1970’s. The dessert consists of bananas, cream, a pie or biscuit base and dulce de leche. 

 

TIRAMISU MOUSSE POT

Origin: Italy

Cooking Method: Chilled

Description: Popularised in Italy during the 1960’s, Tiramisu quickly became the recognised national dessert for Italians. The dish is typically served sharing style, though with so much creamy-coffee goodness, we at Charlie’s thought you would need your very own!

 

 

PECAN TOFFEE ICE CREAM SLAB 

Origin: Southern

Cooking Method: Frozen

Description: Flavour combinations of pecans and toffee have long frequented dessert menus in the South of the United States. With a heavy French culture in cities like New Orleans, pralines (originally from France) have become a local delicacy and flavour combination used throughout Southern dessert recipes.

 

KNICKERBOCKER GLORY 

Origin: England

Cooking Method: Frozen, layered

Description: The knickerbocker glory became popular in the 1960’s throughout Britain, and has since been updated in most Western countries as a “parfait”. Despite the later modern term, we thought it best to stick with the original as it describes the visual of this layered ice cream dessert perfectly!

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